Japan art and Mount Fuji: Suzuki Kiitsu in color by Sawako Utsumi and the flow of Sakai Hōitsu

Japan art and Mount Fuji: Suzuki Kiitsu in color by Sawako Utsumi and the flow of Sakai Hōitsu

The Japanese contemporary artist, Sawako Utsumi, once more produces an adorable art piece based on rinpa (rimpa). In the past, Utsumi heavily focused on Sakai Hōitsu (1761-1828) in relation to rinpa. However, in her latest art piece, the emphasis is on Suzuki Kiitsu (1796-1858). Despite this, and in the knowledge that Hōitsu taught the young Kiitsu before passing away from this world, Utsumi fuses aspects of both but based on her own unique personal artistic traits.

In the art piece titled “Suzuki Kiitsu in color by Sawako Utsumi and the flow of Sakai Hōitsu”, she fuses aspects of Kiitsu (original by Kiitsu below) with Hōitsu based on the mountain landscape. Equally, Utsumi utilizes her own independent color scheme of “Hōitsu through the eyes of modernity turned backward,” when completing “Suzuki Kiitsu in color by Sawako Utsumi and the flow of Sakai Hōitsu” by giving the impression of a natural linkage.

However, in truth, the color scheme and landscape linkage are based on the intricacy of Utsumi who adores many angles to Japanese and European art. This results in the trick of the imagination because both originals are more distant toward each other. Therefore, the creativity and imagination of Utsumi are based on her personal artistic qualities – and the fact that she bases trust on her non-artistic mentor who fuses his personal psychological angle.

Utsumi’s rinpa and the cultural angle is ignited by the richness of high culture that flourished in Kamakura, Koyasan, Kyoto, Nara, Nikko, and other areas over many centuries. Hence, the lore of old Japan, the Meiji Era, and aspects of European art dwell within the artistic spirit of Utsumi. Similarly, her independent landscapes belie more than what the eye can see.

Overall, with Mount Fuji being central to her latest art piece, it is important to focus on both “Hōitsu through the eyes of modernity turned backward” and “Suzuki Kiitsu in color by Sawako Utsumi and the flow of Sakai Hōitsu.” By doing so, the fusions of Hōitsu and Kiitsu are clearly noticeable. Likewise, the independent spirit of Utsumi and her mentor can be felt through the color scheme and the bigger picture that exists outside the limitations of words. Therefore, another adorable art piece can be viewed in isolation – in relation to linkage – in relation to fusions – and based on the psychological undertones that speak no words.

by Lee Jay Walker

http://sawakoart.com

Please email Sawako Utsumi at sawakoart@gmail.com

https://fineartamerica.com/featured/japan-art-and-mount-fuji-suzuki-kiitsu-in-color-by-sawako-utsumi-sawako-utsumi.html

https://fineartamerica.com/featured/hoitsu-through-the-eyes-of-modernity-turned-backward-sawako-utsumi.html

http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/sawako-utsumi.html – Sawako Utsumi and where you can buy her art, postcards, bags, and other products. Also, individuals can contact her for individual requests.

 

Japan art and stunning angle to Sakai Hōitsu who belongs to the Edo Period by Sawako Utsumi

Japan art and stunning angle to Sakai Hōitsu who belongs to the Edo Period by Sawako Utsumi

In the latest art piece by Sawako Utsumi, this contemporary artist focuses on the rinpa (rimpa) finesse of Sakai Hōitsu (1761-1828). Hōitsu, himself, adored Ogata Kōrin (1658-1716) and in time he revitalized the memory of Kōrin. This, in turn, brought Kōrin to a new generation of artists in Japan. Hence, Utsumi respects many classical artists belonging to the Edo Period.

Utsumi’s latest art piece titled “Hōitsu through the eyes of modernity turned backward” is extremely stunning. This applies to her individual style of color that focuses on the original by Hōitsu (original by Hōitsu below) but through the emphasis of modernity. Yet, in Utsumi’s version of modernity, it is a connection with the rich high culture of Japan.

Ironically, the yearning of the past, albeit the cultural past that ignited Kamakura, Koyasan, Kyoto, Nara, Nikko, and others areas of high culture and religious learning; is equally shared by Utsumi who hopes that continuity will also bless a new generation in modern Japan. This passion can be felt in her latest art piece titled “Hōitsu through the eyes of modernity turned backward,”

In a past article, I state, Utsumi isn’t restrained by time and different approaches to art. This really works a treat and the same applies to fusing the richness of her individual internal creativity, with the natural beauty of past European and Japanese artists. The upshot of this really shines through the art of Utsumi because her passion is never dimmed.”

Overall, the latest art piece by Utsumi shines through just like the mountain stands firm and remains strong irrespective of time. Equally, the adorable color scheme and beauty of nature pulls at the heart.

Lee Jay Walker

http://sawakoart.com

Please email Sawako Utsumi at sawakoart@gmail.com

http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/sawako-utsumi.html – Sawako Utsumi and where you can buy her art, postcards, bags, and other products. Also, individuals can contact her for individual requests.

 

 

Contemporary Japanese artist and adorable landscape titled “Hakone in Natural Splendor”

Contemporary Japanese artist and adorable landscape titled “Hakone in Natural Splendor”

The contemporary Japanese artist Sawako Utsumi recently produced another adorable art piece that focused on the natural landscape of Hakone. True to the nature of Utsumi, she bypassed the possibility of focusing on Mount Fuji that can be seen in parts of Hakone and other more famous landmarks. Instead, the first impression of Hakone inspired her, rather than the vast majority of tourists who move on to other parts of Hakone on arrival.

In the art piece titled “Hakone in Natural Splendor,Utsumi focuses strongly on the stunning river that flows in the vicinity of your arrival. This applies to people arriving via the Hakone-Yumoto train station before the majority of tourists moving on to other parts of Hakone. Of course, some people stay in this part of Hakone because of several fine hotels and spas. However, in general, it is a base to moving to other areas because of the stunning natural scenery of Hakone, the rich cultural heritage, and religious setting and legacy of Shintoism.

Utsumi, herself, adores walking by rivers and streams because she loves nature and watching birds – notably kingfishers and dippers that illuminate the natural settings. Hence, it seemed natural that Utsumi would focus heavily on the river based on the twists and curves – and various colors that hit the eyes.

She states, “Walking by the river is where I can escape the stresses of life. It is where nature and the flow of water seem free from the terrible excesses of humanity. Yet, in truth, even the most serene landscape can be an illusion because of pollution and the struggle to survive. Despite this, in moments of wanton forgetfulness, I can dream about a world outside of negativity when I walk along the river bank.”

Overall, just like tourists seek to escape modern life by visiting amazing tourist areas like Hakone, the artist also enables you to escape because of the stunning landscape Utsumi produces. Hence, the river and mountain landscape renders the impact of humans to be secondary and inconsequential. Therefore, another adorable art piece by the contemporary Japanese artist Sawako Utsumi based on the richness of nature.

Written by Lee Jay Walker

https://fineartamerica.com/featured/hakone-in-natural-splendor-sawako-utsumi.html

http://sawakoart.com

Please email Sawako Utsumi at sawakoart@gmail.com

Japanese artist touch to Esaias van de Velde: Light of Japan on Dutch art of yesteryear

Japanese artist touch to Esaias van de Velde: Light of Japan on Dutch art of yesteryear

Another stunning art piece by the Japanese artist, Sawako Utsumi, is illuminated by the unique angle and a delightful color scheme to the original done by Esaias van de Velde. In the past, the same artist who hails from Northern Japan similarly focused on two other art pieces by the same Dutch artist. Therefore, despite Esaias (1587-1630) being born many centuries before and coming from a completely different culture, the contemporary Japanese artist is still fascinated by his rich legacy.

Equally important, in comparison with the original art piece that inspired Utsumi, she focuses on a Christian theme. Hence, the delightful backdrop to the more central Christian church in blue and white is extremely intriguing.

Ironically, at a similar time in history when Christians would feel the full pressure of the Edo Period in Japan in the seventeenth century, Esaias’s Flemish father also fled because of being a Protestant during a long period of sectarianism in parts of Europe. This fact – and the unique angle by Utsumi – is a way of saying that just like this faith survived despite religious persecution, the spirit of Esaias remains in modern times for individuals who adore Dutch art.

In a past article, I state, It is known that Esaias admired Pieter Bruegel the Elder (1525-1569). Intriguingly, this artist was called “Peasant Bruegel.” For Utsumi, the artist Bruegel is also deeply admired because of his depiction of adorable landscapes and artistic themes that focus on peasants. In a sense, Utsumi is trying to fuse both artists within her art based on several angles.”

Despite Esaias dying relatively young, his legacy is extremely rich because he taught many artists of different recognition levels. This notably applies to Jan van Goyen, Martszen de Jonge, Pieter van Laer, Pieter de Molyn, and Pieter de Neyn. He also influenced Jan Asselyn, Zacharias Blijhooft, Adriaen Adriaensz Ghibons, Abraham Vinck, and Willem Viruly. Hence, many artistic concepts, expressions, ideas, themes, and other areas, kept the spirit of Esaias alive long after he perished from this world.

In truth, the latest art piece based on the richness of Esaias is extremely delightful and reaches the heart. This notably applies to the color scheme, the simplicity of the boats, the Christian churches that symbolize continuity, the background of natural energy despite the remoteness of the village, and other amazing angles.

Written by Lee Jay Walker

Please email Sawako Utsumi at sawakoart@gmail.com

BELOW IS A NEW BOOK BASED ON THE ART OF SAWAKO UTSUMI

Book Review: Sawako Utsumi and her Kindred Spirit

European and Japanese Art: Buddhism, Christianity, Landscapes, Rinpa, Shintoism, Ukiyo-e, and Dutch Masters

http://www.lulu.com/shop/lee-jay-walker/sawako-utsumi-and-her-kindred-spirit/paperback/product-22830732.html – Please click on to order the book.

http://sawakoart.com – Sawako Utsumi personal website

http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/sawako-utsumi.html – Sawako Utsumi and where you can buy her art, postcards, bags, and other products. Also, individuals can contact her for individual requests.

https://fineartamerica.com/featured/japanese-artistic-touch-to-esaias-van-der-velde-sawako-utsumi.html

http://fineartamerica.com/featured/japanese-artistic-light-of-esaias-van-de-velde-sawako-utsumi.html

http://fineartamerica.com/featured/japanese-reflection-of-esaias-van-de-velde-sawako-utsumi.html

http://fineartamerica.com/featured/esaias-van-de-velde-in-japanese-light-sawako-utsumi.html

 

Japan art and the paths of Shintoism and Buddhism: Holy men in the snow without Abraham

Japan art and the paths of Shintoism and Buddhism: Holy men in the snow without Abraham

 

In the second part of Sawako Utsumi’s art that focuses on Buddhist and Shinto holy men in the snow, the contemporary Japanese artist once more works a treat. Of course, the art itself provides a lovely backdrop into the interrelationship between Buddhism and Shintoism that seems to flow naturally. Equally, the nuance of simplicity belies the shocking truth of how Buddhism was erased despite the mountains of Afghanistan and in other parts of the world.

Hence, the twin forces of religious imperialism and domination by the respective faiths of Christianity and Islam bypassed Japan based on geography. Yes, Christianity did begin to grow in the later stages of the sixteenth century and early seventeenth century. However, the Tokugawa Period would soon oppress the Christian faith at all costs before the onset of yet another Abrahamic takeover.

Utsumi, while creating an adorable landscape that fuses nature and faith, is also alluding to the gentleness of the terrain despite the harsh winter conditions. Yet, the bigger picture equates to how Japan was luckily isolated from the enslaving and imperialistic forces of Christianity and Islam. Indeed, the natural scene of a Shinto shrine and Buddhist temple in the mountain landscape contrasts with the narrow-mindlessness of Abrahamic faiths that seek certainty in a world based on chaos.

The two art pieces titled “Art of Buddhism and Shintoism and Two Paths in the Snow” and “Art of Japan and the Two Paths of Shintoism and Buddhism: Holy Men in the Snow without Abraham,” alludes to the interwoven faiths of Buddhism and Shintoism that naturally share the same space in Japan. This natural flow of Buddhism and other non-Abrahamic faiths equally flowed in Afghanistan prior to the onset of Islam. However, now the Buddhist component of civilization in Afghanistan is nothing more than a memory. Instead, apostates from Islam face prison or death in 2018 in Sharia inclined nations based on no internal reformation unlike much of the Christian influenced world.

In the other art piece related to the same theme, I comment, Of course, the bigger picture relates to the crushing of Buddhism in history and the ongoing struggle of this faith in the Chittagong Hill Tracts, Ladakh, Rakhine, Tibet, and other parts of the world, where Buddhism is threatened. Equally disturbing, even the historical legacy of Buddhism is being erased by Sunni Islamist forces in Afghanistan and further afield. Likewise, many Traditional Beliefs are still under threat from Christianity and Islam respectively – from small tribes in Brazil to tribes in Indonesia. Therefore, the beacon of the indigenous faith of Shintoism still shines brightly and this says much for Buddhism that did not seek to devour the indigenous faith – unlike the historical reality of Christian and Muslim forces throughout history that erased the past.”

 

Overall, the singular dimension is another adorable landscape by this contemporary Japanese artist that also fills the viewer with natural delight. Likewise, people can connect with aspects of Japanese culture and faith. However, the greater nuance applies to a land that wasn’t conquered by the faiths of Abraham. Therefore, the natural landscape and the interwoven angle of Buddhism and Shintoism relates to continuity and an inner peace based on escaping the excesses of Abrahamic faiths.

Written by Lee Jay Walker

Please email Sawako Utsumi at sawakoart@gmail.com

BELOW IS AN ART BOOK BASED ON THE ART OF SAWAKO UTSUMI

Book Review: Sawako Utsumi and her Kindred Spirit

European and Japanese Art: Buddhism, Christianity, Landscapes, Rinpa, Shintoism, Ukiyo-e, and Dutch Masters

http://www.lulu.com/shop/lee-jay-walker/sawako-utsumi-and-her-kindred-spirit/paperback/product-22830732.html – Please click on to order the book.

https://fineartamerica.com/featured/art-of-japan-and-the-two-paths-of-shintoism-and-buddhism-holy-men-in-the-snow-without-abraham-sawako-utsumi.html Art of Japan and the Two Paths of Shintoism and Buddhism: Holy Men in the Snow without Abraham

https://fineartamerica.com/featured/art-of-buddhism-and-shintoism-and-two-paths-in-the-snow-sawako-utsumi.html Art of Buddhism and Shintoism and Two Paths in the Snow

http://fineartamerica.com/featured/exiled-buddhist-cleric-nichiren-in-the-snow-sawako-utsumi.html – Exiled Buddhist Cleric Nichiren in the Snow

http://fineartamerica.com/featured/buddhist-cleric-nichiren-in-exile-and-homage-to-yoshitoshi-sawako-utsumi.html Buddhist Cleric Nichiren in Exile and Homage to Yoshitoshi

http://fineartamerica.com/featured/buddhist-cleric-nichiren-and-bleak-winter-in-exile-sawako-utsumi.html Buddhist Cleric Nichiren and Bleak Winter in Exile

http://sawakoart.com

 

Japanese Art and the two paths of Buddhism and Shintoism: Faith in the Snow without Abraham

Japanese Art and the two paths of Buddhism and Shintoism: Faith in the Snow without Abraham

 

The latest art piece by Sawako Utsumi, a contemporary Japanese artist who hails from Northern Japan, utilizes the snowy landscape by highlighting the respective strengths of Buddhism and Shintoism despite terrible adversity. Of course, the adversity applies to the terrible weather conditions faced by the holy men of Buddhism and Shintoism in this art piece. However, on a bigger nuance, then it applies to certain international events that have decimated Buddhism and Traditional Beliefs throughout history – and is still happening today.

Before focusing on the bigger picture, the art piece itself titled “Art of Buddhism and Shintoism and Two Paths in the Snow,” is an adorable piece of art by Utsumi. This is based on the amazing landscape, the three holy men of Buddhism and Shintoism, the terrible winter conditions, the power of faith, and the distant Buddhist temple and Shinto shrine.

Indeed, the combined forces of religious faith, the bleakness of winter, and the amazing landscape illuminates the art piece because you feel dragged inside. Hence, a certain shrill of coldness is followed by deep admiration along with a yearning to feel the same certainty in this life.

Of course, the bigger picture relates to the crushing of Buddhism in history and the ongoing struggle of this faith in the Chittagong Hill Tracts, Ladakh, Rakhine, Tibet, and other parts of the world, where Buddhism is threatened. Equally disturbing, even the historical legacy of Buddhism is being erased by Sunni Islamist forces in Afghanistan and further afield. Likewise, many Traditional Beliefs are still under threat from Christianity and Islam respectively – from small tribes in Brazil to tribes in Indonesia. Therefore, the beacon of the indigenous faith of Shintoism still shines brightly and this says much for Buddhism that did not seek to devour the indigenous faith – unlike the historical reality of Christian and Muslim forces throughout history that erased the past.

Overall, a stunning art piece by Utsumi that shows that two religious paths can co-exist naturally without seeking to crush and humiliate the other. Of course, this is a million miles from the two Abrahamic faiths of Christianity and Islam in history that sought to devour and control by endless power mechanisms.

Written by Lee Jay Walker

Please email Sawako Utsumi at sawakoart@gmail.com

BELOW IS AN ART BOOK BASED ON THE ART OF SAWAKO UTSUMI

Book Review: Sawako Utsumi and her Kindred Spirit

European and Japanese Art: Buddhism, Christianity, Landscapes, Rinpa, Shintoism, Ukiyo-e, and Dutch Masters

http://www.lulu.com/shop/lee-jay-walker/sawako-utsumi-and-her-kindred-spirit/paperback/product-22830732.html – Please click on to order the book.

https://fineartamerica.com/featured/art-of-buddhism-and-shintoism-and-two-paths-in-the-snow-sawako-utsumi.html Art of Buddhism and Shintoism and Two Paths in the Snow

http://fineartamerica.com/featured/exiled-buddhist-cleric-nichiren-in-the-snow-sawako-utsumi.html – Exiled Buddhist Cleric Nichiren in the Snow

http://fineartamerica.com/featured/buddhist-cleric-nichiren-in-exile-and-homage-to-yoshitoshi-sawako-utsumi.html Buddhist Cleric Nichiren in Exile and Homage to Yoshitoshi

http://fineartamerica.com/featured/buddhist-cleric-nichiren-and-bleak-winter-in-exile-sawako-utsumi.html Buddhist Cleric Nichiren and Bleak Winter in Exile

http://sawakoart.com

Contemporary Japanese Artist and Shintoism: Kano School and Independent Spirit of Sawako Utsumi

Contemporary Japanese Artist and Shintoism: Kano School and Independent Spirit of Sawako Utsumi

 

Sawako Utsumi is a contemporary Japanese artist who hails from the land of the rising sun. In this art article, the emphasis is on the individualism of Utsumi who is paying utmost respect to two artists belonging to the Kano School of Art. Despite the respect being shown to Kano Motonobu (1476-1559) and Kano Chikanobu (1660-1728), it is abundantly clear that the independent spirit – and unique angle of Utsumi – creates a new approach.

The art pieces by Utsumi are titled In the Shadow of the Past: Utsumi and the Kano School and The Fading Spirit of Kano Chikanobu Awakened by Shintoism. Indeed, the Shinto angle by Utsumi is extremely significant because Buddhism during this period of Japanese history was dominant in major centers of power. Of course, Buddhism and Shintoism – and the powerful impact of Confucianism – flowed naturally either individually, based on fusions, interacted in various spheres of society, and so forth. Similarly, other ideas entered Japan from the Middle Kingdom (China), for example, Daoism.

Yet, for Utsumi, she is turning back to a different time period, whereby the Shinto faith solely guided the people of Japan before external faiths and philosophies impacted. At the same time, the color scheme and religious dominance of the Shinto shrine in both art pieces by Utusmi alter the role of the village depicted by Chikanobu – while moving further away from Motonobu.

I comment in a past article, in respect to homage being shown to Chikanobu, that The title is a reminder that in time all artists and famous people fade into dwindling influence culturally and scientifically, irrespective of the name. Yes, famous artists, philosophers, scientists, and so forth, remain well known but scratch under the surface and most are known superficially apart from specialists. However, holy religious people including Abraham, the Buddha, Jesus, Lord Ram, St. Paul, Mohammed, and many others from faiths already mentioned or from other faiths including Sikhism, remain potent just like they were born yesterday. Hence, Shintoism awakens the fading spirit of Chikanobu because the Shinto faith will continue to be culturally and religiously significant to Japan until the end of time, even if shadows encroach.”

Interestingly, Motonobu belongs to the pre-Edo period of Japan, while Chikanobu was born during the Edo period. Hence, the continuity of the Kano School of Art was maintained based on interaction and opening up to new artistic concepts, irrespective of how minor or major.

Overall, Utsumi is turning the clock back in order to return to a time when the Shinto faith guided in a very limited sense. In the eyes of Utsumi, Folk Shintoism responds to the natural environment in a special way. This is further enhanced by regional Shinto influences that differ throughout this land.

Lee Jay Walker

Please email Sawako Utsumi at sawakoart@gmail.com

https://fineartamerica.com/featured/the-fading-spirit-of-chikanobu-awakened-by-shintoism-sawako-utsumi.html

https://fineartamerica.com/featured/modern-japanese-art-in-the-shadow-of-the-past-utsumi-and-kano-school-sawako-utsumi.html

BELOW IS A NEW BOOK BASED ON THE ART OF SAWAKO UTSUMI

Book Review: Sawako Utsumi and her Kindred Spirit

European and Japanese Art: Buddhism, Christianity, Landscapes, Rinpa, Shintoism, Ukiyo-e, and Dutch Masters

http://www.lulu.com/shop/lee-jay-walker/sawako-utsumi-and-her-kindred-spirit/paperback/product-22830732.html – Please click on to order the book.

http://sawakoart.com