Japanese artist and her colorful and spiritual nuance of Maurice Utrillo

Japanese artist and her colorful and spiritual nuance of Maurice Utrillo

Sawako Utsumi is a delightful contemporary Japanese artist who hails from northern Japan. In her latest art piece, she focuses once more on Maurice Utrillo (1883-1955). However, as usual, her nuance to the original by Utrillo is reshaped by her own religious concepts, ideas, and color schemes.

This complex artist fuses various angles from past European and Japanese artists. At the same time, Utsumi creates her own individual landscapes. Another lovely cultural angle to the art of Utsumi is that she can easily move from Dutch Golden Age art, Impressionism, Rinpa, and various Japanese schools of art. Equally important, this varied artist also focuses heavily on artistic angles related to Buddhism, Christianity, and Shintoism.

Indeed, it is known that Utrillo sought a sense of sanctuary within the Christian faith despite his early upbringing be far from a religious one. Of course, for Utrillo, he never found his existence easy and the role of the Catholic Church became a steadying ship within his troubled life. Therefore, Utsumi implants her own Christian angle into her latest art piece that was inspired by Utrillo, even if the end product is extremely different from the original.

In a past article about Utrillo, I comment, …familiarity and the power of the Christian faith would bestow a semblance of normality for Utrillo. This is a far cry from his teenage years and the reality of his mother that inflamed contradictory forces within his soul.”

The latest art piece by Utsumi is titled, “The Japanese colorful and spiritual nuance of Maurice Utrillo.” In this delightful art piece, the color scheme hits you immediately. The same also applies to the different artistic cityscape that emerges despite Utsumi being influenced by Utrillo. Also, Utsumi embeds a central Christian theme whereby she can imagine Utrillo visiting a church in order to escape the negativities of this world.

Overall, another stunning art piece by this complex contemporary Japanese artist that delights to the maximum. This relates to her personal color schemes and Utsumi’s creative spiritual angle that fluctuates depending on the art theme being depicted.

Book Review: Sawako Utsumi and her Kindred Spirit

European and Japanese Art: Buddhism, Christianity, Landscapes, Rinpa, Shintoism, Ukiyo-e, and Dutch Masters

http://www.lulu.com/shop/lee-jay-walker/sawako-utsumi-and-her-kindred-spirit/paperback/product-22830732.html – Please click on to order the book.

http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/sawako-utsumi.html – Art of Sawako Utsumi and where you can buy her art, postcards, bags, and other products. Also, individuals can contact her for individual requests.

https://fineartamerica.com/featured/japanese-colorful-and-spiritual-nuance-of-maurice-utrillo-sawako-utsumi.html

http://fineartamerica.com/featured/utrillo-and-church-seasonal-change-in-paris-by-japanese-artist-sawako-utsumi.html

http://fineartamerica.com/featured/mirage-of-utrillo-sawako-utsumi.html

http://fineartamerica.com/featured/japanese-eyes-and-utrillo-sawako-utsumi.html

http://sawakoart.com

Contemporary Japanese Artist and Shintoism: Kano School and Independent Spirit of Sawako Utsumi

Contemporary Japanese Artist and Shintoism: Kano School and Independent Spirit of Sawako Utsumi

 

Sawako Utsumi is a contemporary Japanese artist who hails from the land of the rising sun. In this art article, the emphasis is on the individualism of Utsumi who is paying utmost respect to two artists belonging to the Kano School of Art. Despite the respect being shown to Kano Motonobu (1476-1559) and Kano Chikanobu (1660-1728), it is abundantly clear that the independent spirit – and unique angle of Utsumi – creates a new approach.

The art pieces by Utsumi are titled In the Shadow of the Past: Utsumi and the Kano School and The Fading Spirit of Kano Chikanobu Awakened by Shintoism. Indeed, the Shinto angle by Utsumi is extremely significant because Buddhism during this period of Japanese history was dominant in major centers of power. Of course, Buddhism and Shintoism – and the powerful impact of Confucianism – flowed naturally either individually, based on fusions, interacted in various spheres of society, and so forth. Similarly, other ideas entered Japan from the Middle Kingdom (China), for example, Daoism.

Yet, for Utsumi, she is turning back to a different time period, whereby the Shinto faith solely guided the people of Japan before external faiths and philosophies impacted. At the same time, the color scheme and religious dominance of the Shinto shrine in both art pieces by Utusmi alter the role of the village depicted by Chikanobu – while moving further away from Motonobu.

I comment in a past article, in respect to homage being shown to Chikanobu, that The title is a reminder that in time all artists and famous people fade into dwindling influence culturally and scientifically, irrespective of the name. Yes, famous artists, philosophers, scientists, and so forth, remain well known but scratch under the surface and most are known superficially apart from specialists. However, holy religious people including Abraham, the Buddha, Jesus, Lord Ram, St. Paul, Mohammed, and many others from faiths already mentioned or from other faiths including Sikhism, remain potent just like they were born yesterday. Hence, Shintoism awakens the fading spirit of Chikanobu because the Shinto faith will continue to be culturally and religiously significant to Japan until the end of time, even if shadows encroach.”

Interestingly, Motonobu belongs to the pre-Edo period of Japan, while Chikanobu was born during the Edo period. Hence, the continuity of the Kano School of Art was maintained based on interaction and opening up to new artistic concepts, irrespective of how minor or major.

Overall, Utsumi is turning the clock back in order to return to a time when the Shinto faith guided in a very limited sense. In the eyes of Utsumi, Folk Shintoism responds to the natural environment in a special way. This is further enhanced by regional Shinto influences that differ throughout this land.

Lee Jay Walker

Please email Sawako Utsumi at sawakoart@gmail.com

https://fineartamerica.com/featured/the-fading-spirit-of-chikanobu-awakened-by-shintoism-sawako-utsumi.html

https://fineartamerica.com/featured/modern-japanese-art-in-the-shadow-of-the-past-utsumi-and-kano-school-sawako-utsumi.html

BELOW IS A NEW BOOK BASED ON THE ART OF SAWAKO UTSUMI

Book Review: Sawako Utsumi and her Kindred Spirit

European and Japanese Art: Buddhism, Christianity, Landscapes, Rinpa, Shintoism, Ukiyo-e, and Dutch Masters

http://www.lulu.com/shop/lee-jay-walker/sawako-utsumi-and-her-kindred-spirit/paperback/product-22830732.html – Please click on to order the book.

http://sawakoart.com

Contemporary Japanese Artist: The Fading Spirit of Kano Chikanobu Awakened by Shintoism

Contemporary Japanese Artist: The Fading Spirit of Kano Chikanobu Awakened by Shintoism

The contemporary Japanese artist Sawako Utsumi in her latest art piece titled The Fading Spirit of Kano Chikanobu Awakened by Shintoism, provides an adorable individual approach. This applies to a fusion of homage to Kano Chikanobu (1660-1728) along with a spark of individualism that takes you away from the original and then back again.

Another delightful approach by Utsumi applies to the Shinto angle. Indeed, while the impact of Buddhism, Confucianism, Daoism, and Shintoism was more powerful during the lifetime of Chikanobu (original art piece below), the contemporary artist focuses on the religious angle within her art piece. Of course, for Utsumi, the significance belongs to the indigenous faith of Shintoism that continues to endure in modern Japan, even if sometimes in the shadows.

The title is a reminder that in time all artists and famous people fade into dwindling influence culturally and scientifically, irrespective of the name. Yes, famous artists, philosophers, scientists, and so forth, remain well known but scratch under the surface and most are known superficially apart from specialists. However, holy religious people including Abraham, the Buddha, Jesus, Lord Ram, St. Paul, Mohammed, and many others from faiths already mentioned or from other faiths including Sikhism, remain potent just like they were born yesterday. Hence, Shintoism awakens the fading spirit of Chikanobu because the Shinto faith will continue to be culturally and religiously significant to Japan until the end of time, even if shadows encroach.

Chikanobu lived during the early Edo period and while Japan was mainly isolated – but not completely – the flows of the past continued. In other words, Chinese and Japanese classics impacted greatly on the famous Kano School of Art.

Utsumi herself plays on this but in the opposite direction because she is returning to the past. Therefore, while modern Japan is awash with modern technology, the reality of animation, communication via social media, skyscrapers, the impact of different cultures including America, and other realities, Utsumi binds her homage to the traditions of Shintoism. Equally important, Utsumi does this based on the distant approach taken by Shintoism, whereby nature and a subtle reality are more important than open proselytism or a rich theocratic dogma that belongs to other international faiths.

Lee Jay Walker

Please email Sawako Utsumi at sawakoart@gmail.com

https://fineartamerica.com/featured/the-fading-spirit-of-chikanobu-awakened-by-shintoism-sawako-utsumi.html

BELOW IS A NEW BOOK BASED ON THE ART OF SAWAKO UTSUMI

 

Book Review: Sawako Utsumi and her Kindred Spirit

European and Japanese Art: Buddhism, Christianity, Landscapes, Rinpa, Shintoism, Ukiyo-e, and Dutch Masters

http://www.lulu.com/shop/lee-jay-walker/sawako-utsumi-and-her-kindred-spirit/paperback/product-22830732.html – Please click on to order the book.

http://sawakoart.com

Japanese Art and Esaias Van De Velde: Christian Churches and Dutch Villages Through Japanese Eyes

Japanese Art and Esaias Van De Velde: Christian Churches and Dutch Villages Through Japanese Eyes

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The contemporary Japanese artist Sawako Utsumi adores the richness of Dutch Art from the distant past of the fifteenth to seventeenth century. In this article, the focus is firmly on Esaias van de Velde who passed away in 1630. However, despite the clear admiration held by Utsumi who is paying homage to Esaias, the color scheme and central theme of Christianity in a placid sense are extremely pronounced.

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If you fast forward to modern times in Holland and Japan then the old world is still ticking to the traditions of the past in the countryside. Yes, the religious fervor and areas of stratification will be different in comparison with the past, yet despite this, the images conjured up in the mind survives.

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I state in a past article, “In the realm of fame, history, time, religious values and natural landscapes then Esaias and Utsumi are a million miles apart. However, in the world of art then anything is possible providing the natural feel is linked with passion and admiration. Therefore, for Utsumi, it is natural to flow between time, space, concepts and ideas because the mystery of Shintoism isn’t constrained by religious orthodoxy.”

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In the latest art piece by Utsumi titled Japanese Artistic Light of Esaias Van De Velde, the color scheme and central role of Christianity is striking. Likewise, people depicted seem to have time to waste based on tranquility. At the same time, houses look quaint and the natural flow of life seems a million miles away from modern Tokyo where Utsumi currently resides.

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It is known that Esaias admired Pieter Bruegel the Elder (1525-1569). Intriguingly, this artist was called “Peasant Bruegel.” For Utsumi, the artist Bruegel is also deeply admired because of his depiction of adorable landscapes and artistic themes that focus on peasants. In a sense, Utsumi is trying to fuse both artists within her art based on several angles.

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Utsumi’s other art piece titled Japanese Reflection of Esaias van de Velde ties in greatly with her latest art piece titled Japanese Artistic Light of Esaias Van De Velde. Therefore, despite the homage being shown by Utsumi towards Esaias, it is abundantly clear that her own thoughts are focused on different themes outside of the original art pieces by Esaias and this notably applies to the Christian angle.

Lee Jay Walker

Please email Sawako Utsumi at sawakoart@gmail.com

BELOW IS A NEW BOOK BASED ON THE ART OF SAWAKO UTSUMI

Book Review: Sawako Utsumi and her Kindred Spirit

European and Japanese Art: Buddhism, Christianity, Landscapes, Rinpa, Shintoism, Ukiyo-e, and Dutch Masters

sawako-book-3

http://www.lulu.com/shop/lee-jay-walker/sawako-utsumi-and-her-kindred-spirit/paperback/product-22830732.html – Please click on to order the book.

http://sawakoart.com – Sawako Utsumi personal website

http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/sawako-utsumi.html – Sawako Utsumi and where you can buy her art, postcards, bags, and other products. Also, individuals can contact her for individual requests.

http://fineartamerica.com/featured/japanese-artistic-light-of-esaias-van-de-velde-sawako-utsumi.html

http://fineartamerica.com/featured/japanese-reflection-of-esaias-van-de-velde-sawako-utsumi.html

http://fineartamerica.com/featured/esaias-van-de-velde-in-japanese-light-sawako-utsumi.html

Japanese Artist and Aert Van Der Neer: Christianity, Dutch Art, Edo Period and Altered Realities

Japanese Artist and Aert Van Der Neer: Christianity, Dutch Art, Edo Period and Altered Realities

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The Dutch Golden Age of art is a true blessing because the potency remains despite the enormous distance in time. Not surprisingly, the contemporary Japanese artist Sawako Utsumi adores this reality. This fact can be seen visibly in her respective homage to Aert van der Neer and Esaias van de Velde. Therefore, her latest two art pieces in relation to van der Neer (1603-1677) really stand out because of passion, altered realities, color schemes, new induced Christian church – and a plethora of other intriguing factors.

In the latest art piece by Utsumi (highlighted above), titled Japanese Art and Semblance of Aert van der Neer, it is apparent that a changed landscape emerges. Yet, this reality is extremely gentle, despite the significance and cultural factors behind this change. After all, interactions took place between the Dutch and Japanese in distant history despite enormous constraints.

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On top of this, the religious wars that pitted Catholicism and Protestantism in parts of Europe, just like the sectarian conflicts involving Sunni Takfiri Islamists and the persecuted Shia in the modern world, equally held true during the Edo period in Japan. Indeed, during the lifetime of van der Neer, the crushing of Christianity in Japan took place during the long years of the Tokugawa period (Edo period). Equally intriguing, the Edo period began in the birth year of van der Neer in 1603.

Ironically, the Dutch, just like the British supporting non-Christians against Christians throughout history, also played a part in the crushing of the Japanese Christian rebellion. After all, the Dutch gave tacit support, irrespective if limited in scale, in the crushing of the Christian peasant uprising called the Shimabara Rebellion (1637-1638). Therefore, when Christians were holding out in Hara Castle the Dutch abide by Tokugawa requests and bomb the followers of Christianity.

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In this sense, Utsumi is recollecting history but this time instead of the eradication of Christianity in Japan during the Edo period, you now have a refined Christian church in the background that replaces the windmill by van der Neer. This intriguing reality is obvious to people of history but is most likely lost on people who view without such knowledge. Similarly, while Japanese Christians became martyrs for the Christian cross, the poverty they suffered was equally felt by van der Neer, despite the causes being based on enormously different factors.

Overall, just like the earlier art piece by Utsumi called Japanese Light in Remembrance of Aert van der Neer, it is clear that you have distinctive hidden factors. Therefore, the cultural, historical, religious – and independent altered landscape by Utsumi – works a treat and this equally applies to the adorable color scheme by this modern Japanese artist.

Lee Jay Walker

http://sawakoart.com – Sawako Utsumi personal website

http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/sawako-utsumi.html – Sawako Utsumi and where you can buy her art, postcards, bags, and other products. Also, individuals can contact her for individual requests.

http://fineartamerica.com/featured/japanese-art-and-semblance-of-aert-van-der-neer-sawako-utsumi.html

http://fineartamerica.com/featured/japanese-light-in-remembrance-of-aert-van-der-neer-sawako-utsumi.html

http://fineartamerica.com/featured/japanese-reflection-of-esaias-van-de-velde-sawako-utsumi.html

http://fineartamerica.com/featured/esaias-van-de-velde-in-japanese-light-sawako-utsumi.html

Modern Tokyo Times images

 

Japanese Artist and Homage to the Dutch Artist Aert Van Der Neer

Japanese Artist and Homage to the Dutch Artist Aert Van Der Neer

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The artist Aert van der Neer (1603-1677 ) belongs to the Dutch Golden Age of art but sadly his life was blighted by poverty. It is difficult to imagine the real world that engulfed Dutch artists in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, but artists including van der Neer provide glimpses. In saying that, these glimpses mainly apply to architecture, culture, landscapes, rural areas and other natural realities. However, the world that entrapped van der Neer personally during his life remains distant from his art. This applies to the endless struggles he faced with providing for his family, similarly it is known that van der Neer died in abject poverty.

Despite everything the legacy of van der Neer (Original image below is Aert van de Neer) remains potent within Dutch art. Likewise, for modern artists like Sawako Utsumi, who hails from northern Japan, it is clear that his individualistic qualities shine out. Interestingly, Utsumi did two recent art pieces focusing on another Dutch artist called Esaias van de Velde (Third image by Sawako Utsumi paying homage to Esaias van de Velde). Therefore, the Dutch art world of the sixteenth and seventeenth century appeals greatly to Utsumi.

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Turning back to van der Neer then Kathleen Kuiper says “Apart from a number of accomplished winter scenes—such as View of the River in Winter in the manner of Hendrik Avercamp (1585–1634), who was among the first northern Dutch painters of winter scenes—van der Neer specialized in canal and river landscapes seen by the light of sunset or early dawn or—most characteristic of all—by moonlight, as in River Scene by Moonlight. Within this somewhat limited range, van der Neer had no rival among his contemporaries. His sensitive handling of subdued light and its reflections on water and in the windows of riverside houses is unequaled. Scholars agree that he was at the height of his powers from the mid-1640s to about 1660.”

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Utsumi focuses on the Frozen River at Sunset by van der Neer. However, like usual this intriguing Japanese artist provides her own angles in relation to color schemes, the background of nature and other realities. The upshot being a lovely homage to van der Neer whereby the original enters the mindset. Yet, the art piece equally acknowledges the personal qualities of Utsumi who creates a lovely art piece titled Japanese Light in Remembrance of Aert van der Neer.

At the time of writing, it is known that Utsumi will soon complete another art piece based on the exquisiteness of van der Neer. It is known that this includes replacing the background windmill with a Christian church. Therefore, the individuality and special qualities of Utsumi will fuse itself within the adorable art of van der Neer.

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Overall, the intriguing reality of van der Neer shines brightly within the art of this contemporary Japanese artist. In this sense, while the differences of time, culture, religion, and notoriety are a million miles apart, the commonality of “art” and “passion” shines through elegantly by Utsumi who is paying homage to this distinguished Dutch artist.

Lee Jay Walker

http://sawakoart.com – Sawako Utsumi personal website

http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/sawako-utsumi.html – Sawako Utsumi and where you can buy her art, postcards, bags, and other products. Also, individuals can contact her for individual requests.

http://fineartamerica.com/featured/japanese-light-in-remembrance-of-aert-van-der-neer-sawako-utsumi.html

http://fineartamerica.com/featured/japanese-reflection-of-esaias-van-de-velde-sawako-utsumi.html

http://fineartamerica.com/featured/esaias-van-de-velde-in-japanese-light-sawako-utsumi.html

http://www.britannica.com/biography/Aert-van-der-Neer

Sawako Utsumi – 1st, 3rd, and 4th image

Aert van der Neer – 2nd image

Japan Art and Esaias Van De Velde: Shades of Light Suppress Time and Culture

Japan Art and Esaias Van De Velde: Shades of Light Suppress Time and Culture

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Sawako Utsumi is a modern Japanese artist who focuses on personal landscapes, nature, culture, aspects of Japanese art and re-awakening famous artists but with a twinkle of personal shades, altered images to a minor degree, fusions of culture and unique angles that apply to her own personal art. Of course, with so many amazing artists from the past it is intriguing that Utsumi focuses on such varied European artists. This currently applies to L.S. Lowry, Maurice Utrillo and Esaias van de Velde. However, in time other European artists will be highlighted within her art, various Japanese art forms, individual landscapes, cityscapes, religious art and other areas of art that reach her inner artistic soul.

In the realm of fame, history, time, religious values and natural landscapes then Esaias and Utsumi are a million miles apart. Despite this, in the world of art then anything is possible providing the natural feel is linked with passion and admiration. Therefore, for Utsumi it is natural to flow between time, space, concepts and ideas because the mystery of Shintoism isn’t constrained by religious orthodoxy.

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The art piece by Utsumi titled Esaias van de Velde in Japanese Light (top and second image) is extremely intriguing because unlike the original sketching by Esaias the focus of Utsumi is to create her own individual color scheme. On top of this, individual elements by Utsumi increases the awareness of the respective viewer.

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Also, another art piece by Utsumi titled Japanese Reflection of Esaias van de Velde works a treat with Esaias van de Velde in Japanese Light because you can easily imagine these places being either neighboring villages – or the same village but during slightly different periods of the year. This reality is far from the original two art pieces by Esaias therefore this fact is extremely intriguing.

In another article I comment: The female contemporary artist Sawako Utsumi adores the exquisite landscapes of Esaias. It could well be that Esaias reminds Utsumi of aspects of her childhood in Sendai and her visits to the countryside of Fukushima – and other rural communities in adjacent prefectures. Therefore, the rural landscapes by Esaias and other artistic themes by this sublime artist appeals greatly to Utsumi.”

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Esaias passed away in 1630 and hails from distant Holland. This reality is a far cry from Utsumi who was born in Japan and is a contemporary artist. Despite this, and the enormous differences in culture, religion, modernity, space and time – the amazing art and legacy of Esaias suits the thought patterns of Utsumi. After all, the search for inner peace, a place called home in a chaotic world, adorable landscapes, nature and natural artistic dimensions aren’t set in stone. Given this reality, Esaias van de Velde in Japanese Light and Japanese Reflection of Esaias van de Velde by Utsumi are two adorable art pieces that pay homage to Esaias, while highlighting the enormous individuality of Utsumi and focusing on her own personal concepts. Also, the religious and cultural themes play into past interactions between Holland and Japan based on the mirage of Dejima but with the end result being “light.”

http://sawakoart.com – Sawako Utsumi personal website

http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/sawako-utsumi.html – Sawako Utsumi and where you can buy her art, post cards, bags, and other products. Also, individuals can contact her for individual requests.

http://fineartamerica.com/featured/japanese-reflection-of-esaias-van-de-velde-sawako-utsumi.html

http://fineartamerica.com/featured/esaias-van-de-velde-in-japanese-light-sawako-utsumi.html