Japanese art and Blackley Forest: The spirit of Judy Doggett Walker and fighting dementia

Japanese art and Blackley Forest: The spirit of Judy Doggett Walker and fighting dementia

The contemporary Japanese artist, Sawako Utsumi, was asked to pay homage to the late Judy Doggett Walker (1934 to 2019) who resided in Manchester, England. Of course, unlike other art pieces by Utsumi, this art piece is tinged with sadness. However, amid the grief, you can also feel a connection with her beloved Blackley and the Laburnum Tree that brought such joy to Judy Doggett Walker.

Of course, while Utsumi depicts the contours of the River Irk in Blackley naturally, the Laburnum Tree was planted based on the childhood memories of Judy Doggett Walker. Indeed, an earlier art piece depicting the same tree in Heaton Park also brought great joy to Judy Doggett Walker during her last few years on this earth. Hence, it is fitting that an art piece commemorating her life also features a tree that she remembered deeply despite her struggles with dementia.

In the art piece titled The Artistic Spirit of Judy Doggett Walker in Blackley Forest, you have a fusion of ideas emanating from her son, Lee Jay Walker. For example, while Judy Doggett Walker knew full well the natural beauty of Blackley Forest, her real memories of joy apply to Boggart Hole Clough in Blackley and Rhodes Woods. This applies to natural memories with her father Walter Doggett, her brothers and sisters, her husband Eric Joseph Walker, her own children, and other memories by herself or with friends. However, the spirit of Blackley Forest adjoins naturally to Blackley Cemetery where she is buried along with her father and husband – and others – who passed away from this world a long time ago.

Likewise, her last two real days out apply to Boggart Hole Clough and the River Irk that is depicted in this art piece. In other words, for people who knew her well, you can feel her spirit in Blackley Forest irrespective if this is based on memory or the feeling of an estrange version of quantum entanglement.

Ironically, the memories of Blackley and the surrounding areas all helped Judy Doggett Walker with her struggle against dementia. Hence, often her son would talk about Boggart Hole Clough, Rhodes Woods, Walter Doggett, her beloved memory of the Laburnum Tree, the River Irk, Anne Doggett, Keith Doggett, the names of flowers in the local smaller park, and other important areas including her husband Eric Joseph Walker that are all tied to Blackley and the adjacent area. Thereby, it is fitting that this adorable art piece to commemorate Judy Doggett Walker is based on her beloved Blackley that happens to be blessed with stunning areas of nature that easily connects to places like Heaton Park and Rhodes Woods.

Overall, Judy Doggett Walker now rests in Blackley cemetery with her husband Eric Joseph Walker and her father Walter Doggett – and other family members. Thereby, while visiting Blackley Forest and entering Blackley cemetery that is adjacent, I personally can feel the spirit  (or quantum entanglement) of my later mother – irrespective if this is really based on memory. Hence, the art piece by Utsumi represents a younger Judy Doggett Walker who flowed throughout her life naturally based on her Christian faith – just like the River Irk continues to flow through Blackley.

Written by Lee Jay Walker

https://fineartamerica.com/profiles/sawako-utsumi.html Sawako Utsumi and where you can buy her art, postcards, bags, and other products. Also, individuals can contact her for individual requests.

https://fineartamerica.com/featured/the-artistic-spirit-of-judy-doggett-walker-in-blackley-forest-sawako-utsumi.html The Artistic Spirit of Judy Doggett Walker in Blackley Forest

https://fineartamerica.com/featured/hidden-gem-of-blackley-forest-in-manchester-sawako-utsumi.html Hidden Gem of Blackley Forest by Sawako Utsumi

http://fineartamerica.com/featured/laburnum-tree-in-splendid-isolation-sawako-utsumi.html Laburnum Tree in Splendid Isolation by Sawako Utsumi

http://sawakoart.com Sawako Utsumi and articles related to her art.

 

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